Physiological Noise in Near-infrared Spectroscopy: Implications for Optical Brain Computer Interfacing


Coyle, S and Ward, T. and Markham, C. (2004) Physiological Noise in Near-infrared Spectroscopy: Implications for Optical Brain Computer Interfacing. Conference Proceedings IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc., 6. pp. 4540-4543.

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Abstract

Near-infrared spectroscopy is a non-invasive optical method used to detect functional activation of the cerebral cortex. Cognitive, visual, auditory and motor tasks are among the functions that have been investigated by this technique in the context of optical brain computer interfacing. In order to determine whether the optical response is due to a stimulus, it is essential to identify and reduce the effects of physiological noise. This paper characterizes noise typically present in optical responses and reports signal processing approaches used to overcome such noise.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: near-infrared spectroscopy; cerebral haemodynamics; physiological noise; brain computer interface;
Academic Unit: Faculty of Science and Engineering > Electronic Engineering
Item ID: 2785
Depositing User: Dr Tomas Ward
Date Deposited: 19 Oct 2011 14:15
Journal or Publication Title: Conference Proceedings IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc.
Publisher: IEEE
Refereed: Yes
URI:

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