Are There Sex Differences in Geographic Knowledge and Understanding?


Kitchin, Rob (1996) Are There Sex Differences in Geographic Knowledge and Understanding? The Geographical Journal, 162 (3). pp. 273-286.

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Abstract

Research by both geographers and psychologists suggests that there are differences in females' and males' everyday geographic and spatial knowledge. These differences in knowledge have been attributed to variances in biology and hormonal levels; differences in social status, culture and education; and differences in the ability to answer questions and think about geographic space. This paper examines these theories and explores the everyday geographic knowledge of females and males using both quantitative exercises and qualitative interviews. In contrast to most studies, only a few minor differences were found between females' and males' knowledge, their ability to answer the questions set and the strategies of spatial thought employed and it is suggested that any differences found between the sexes in other studies are due to socio-cultural factors reinforcing gender stereotypes.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: sex differences; cognitive map knowledge; spatial ability;
Academic Unit: Faculty of Social Sciences > Geography
Faculty of Social Sciences > Research Institutes > National Institute for Regional and Spatial analysis, NIRSA
Item ID: 5404
Depositing User: Prof. Rob Kitchin
Date Deposited: 17 Sep 2014 16:28
Journal or Publication Title: The Geographical Journal
Publisher: The Royal Geographical Society
Refereed: Yes
URI:

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